• Tuesday, April 8th, 2014

Development of a Non-O157:H7 Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) Lateral Flow Device

Cesar Nadala, Jason Cantera and Mansour Samadpour Abstract A lateral flow device was developed for detection of non-O157:H7 EHEC using polyclonal antibodies generated in goats against each of the top six non-O157:H7 EHEC targets. The device was tested against a panel of bacterial cells as well as on spiked enrichments. It was able to correctly identify and distinguish each target Read More

  • Friday, January 17th, 2014

Escherichia coli O157:H7 infections associated with consumption of locally grown strawberries contaminated by deer

Laidler MR, Tourdjman M, Buser GL, Hostetler T, Repp KK, Leman R, Samadpour M, Keene WE. Abstract BACKGROUND: An outbreak of Escherichia coli O157:H7 was identified in Oregon through an increase in Shiga toxin-producing E. coli cases with an indistinguishable, novel pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) subtyping pattern. METHODS: We defined confirmed cases as persons from whom E. coli O157:H7 with the outbreak PFGE Read More

  • Thursday, December 12th, 2013

Analysis of the genome of the Escherichia coli O157:H7 2006 spinach-associated outbreak isolate indicates candidate genes that may enhance virulence.

Kulasekara BR, Jacobs M, Zhou Y, Wu Z, Sims E, Saenphimmachak C, Rohmer L, Ritchie JM, Radey M, McKevitt M, Freeman TL, Hayden H, Haugen E, Gillett W, Fong C, Chang J, Beskhlebnaya V, Waldor MK, Samadpour M, Whittam TS, Kaul R, Brittnacher M, Miller SI. Source Molecular and Cellular Biology Program, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195, USA. Abstract In addition to causing diarrhea, Escherichia coli O157:H7 infection can lead to hemolytic-uremic syndrome (HUS), a severe Read More

  • Thursday, December 12th, 2013

Evolution of Salmonella enterica Virulence via Point Mutations in the Fimbrial Adhesin

Dagmara I. Kisiela, Sujay Chattopadhyay, Stephen J. Libby, Joyce E. Karlinsey, Ferric C. Fang, Veronika Tchesnokova, Jeremy J. Kramer, Viktoriya Beskhlebnaya, Mansour Samadpour, Krzysztof Grzymajlo, Maciej Ugorski,3 Emily W. Lankau, Roderick I. Mackie, Steven Clegg, and Evgeni V. Sokurenko Abstract Whereas the majority of pathogenic Salmonella serovars are capable of infecting many different animal species, typically producing a self-limited gastroenteritis, serovars with narrow host-specificity exhibit increased virulence and their infections Read More

  • Wednesday, September 25th, 2013

Evaluation of Process Parameters Used During the Fermentation and Drying of Italian-Style Salami

Abstract Raw ground pork was inoculated with ca. 8 log CFU/mL of a five-strain cocktail of Salmonella spp. The inoculated meat was mixed with non-meat ingredients and the batter stuffed into 100 mm casings to produce an Italian style salami. Following fermentation, product was dried at either low, medium or high temperatures. Samples were taken Read More

  • Monday, September 16th, 2013

Non-O157 Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) with AB5 Subtilase Cytotoxin (SubAB) Found in Commercial Ground Beef and Spinach Products

Abstract Introduction: Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) strains are a subset of Shiga toxin–producing E. coli (STEC) that may cause hemorrhagic colitis and in severe cases hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) and thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP). EHECs are usually identified by the presence of two virulence genes, stx(encoding Shiga toxin) and eae (encoding intimin). AB5 subtilase cytotoxin (SubAB) was found Read More

  • Wednesday, August 14th, 2013

Co-occurrence of Escherichia coli Shiga Toxin 2d-activatable Variant and AB5 Subtilase in STEC in Commercial Ground Beef

Abstract Shiga toxin–producing E. coli (STEC) is a food- and water-borne pathogen that causes hemorrhagic colitis (bloody diarrhea), and in severe cases hemolytic uremic syndrome and thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura. Shiga toxin (Stx) has two forms: Stx1 and Stx 2. A variant Stx2, called Stx2d-activatable is more virulent than othersubtypes and its detection in human isolates was shown Read More

  • Thursday, August 1st, 2013

Isolation and Identification of the Causative Agent for a Salmonellosis Outbreak from White Pepper

Abstract In March 2009, epidemiologist in several western states (California, Nevada, Oregon and Washington) noted a spike in the number of cases of an extremely rare Salmonella serotype – Salmonella Rissen (mean for U.S. < 10 cases/year). A coordinated multi-state investigation ensued, but despite intensive structured interviews, no common source became apparent. Spices were considered Read More

  • Wednesday, July 24th, 2013

Effect of Lactate and Diacetate-based Antimicrobial Agents on Listeria Monocytogenes in Ready-To-Eat Meat Products

ABSTRACT Survival and growth of Listeria monocytogenes on RTE meat products formulated with a combination of lactate and diacetate-based antimicrobial agents was investigated. Cured (large diameter) and cured and smoked (small diameter) commercial RTE meat containing varying levels of sodium lactate/sodium diacetate, potassium lactate/sodium diacetate, sodium-potassium lactate/sodium diacetate were surface inoculated with approximately 100 CFU/100g of a five-strain mixture of Read More

  • Monday, July 15th, 2013

Surveillance of Campylobacter spp., Escherichia coli O157, Listeria monocytogenes, Salmonella spp., Shigella spp., and Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus In Poultry

ABSTRACT Poultry meat has been implicated as a significant source of food-borne pathogens that can cause fatal illness among consumers. This study was undertaken to determine the level of contamination of Campylobacter spp., Escherichia coli O157, Listeria monocytogenes, Salmonella spp., Shigella spp., and Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus in poultry across 10 states in the United States. Read More

IEH News
July 15, 2013
IEH Laboratories & Consulting Group will be attending the 2013 IAFP Annual Meeting. Visit us at booth #413.
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June 7, 2013
IEH Laboratories & Consulting Group wishes to announce the availability of updated screening test capabilities to detect Hepatitis A in berries, fruits, vegetables, produce, shellfish and water. Turnaround time is 1 to 5 days.
Read More Here